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For those who want to add a theatrical spectacle to their riverside event or festival, Walk The Plank might have just the answer.

Walk the Plank are outdoor arts specialists who cater for mass appeal. They empower artists through creative development, transforming people and the places in which they live through opportunities to engage with accessible artistic experience.   

Following the success of River Stories at the inaugural Reading on Thames Festival 2017, Walk the Plank is now promoting its latest project, River Stories, around the UK as part of its mission to attract more audiences to its illuminated show.

The centrepiece to River Stories is a 50m long illuminated River Monster who joins forces with a swan and a fish to create what’s billed as an amusing tale animated with pyrotechnics, special effects and a bespoke musical soundtrack.

Designed for a riverside audience of up to 5,000 people, this family friendly show is Instagram friendly, with its trio of creatures ready for their close-up.

“With the growing popularity of river festivals around the UK we wanted to create something different that would delight people of all ages. River Monsters’ debut last year at the first Reading on Thames Festival was an astounding success with people enthralled by the scale and animation of what they saw.  This captivating show, which lasts up to 45 minutes, can be adapted to a range of sites and locations,” said John Wassell, Walk the Plank creative producer.

“Walk the Plank continues to be a trailblazer for outdoor arts in the UK; combining a constantly inventive artistic vision with socially grounded practice, the company brilliantly delivers true delight for audience’s hand-in-hand with authentic community engagement, as well as being an inspiration for everyone else working in the sector,” says Angus MacKechnie, executive director, ISAN

Based in Salford, in the North West of England, Walk the Plank is a registered charity and a National Portfolio Organisation of Arts Council England.